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Posts tagged ‘sxsw’

#openfood launches at SXSW & trends worldwide on twitter!

To say that this weekend’s Open Food Data panel at South by Southwest was a success would be understating a bit. Here at Foodtree we think we speak for everyone involved when we say that we’re excited for the future and grateful for the response and thoughtful conversations that this effort has ignited so far.

Everything you need to get involved in pushing Open Food Data forward can be found at the Open Food website.

#openfood Trends Worldwide

During the panel on Sunday many attendants were using the #openfood hashtag to share ideas and updates with the people who couldn’t make it to the panel in person. What you may not have realized was that about 15 minutes into the panel that hashtag began trending worldwide on Twitter; an uncommon and unique feat that many hope to experience and very few accomplish (aside from Justin Bieber, that is).

That alone is an amazing show of support for the open food data movement, and as movement’s go we can officially call this one launched!

SXSW Where to Eat Map, a collaboration with Food+Tech Connect, Eat Well Guide, and Animal Welfare Approved

South by Southwest Interactive is a yearly conference in Austin, Texas that brings together engineers, entrepreneurs, and technology companies looking to share best practices, see emerging trends, and connect over the exciting developments happening around the world. Anthony, our CEO, is in Austin this weekend taking in the event, so if you’re there and want to connect you can ping him on twitter: @tonynicalo

Where to Eat in Austin

We got together with Food+Tech Connect, Eat Well Guide, and the Animal Welfare Approved to cultivate a list of stand-out food spots in town, and you might be surprised to hear it’s not all barbecue! Head to www.foodtree.com/sxsw to install the app on any mobile phone and to consult the list while you’re looking for your next meal.

The collaboration on the mobile app culminates tomorrow night during a special dinner event called Networked Food System. The gathering will welcome innovators, entrepreneurs, government officials and food systems experts to a delicious dinner and conversation about the direction our food system is headed. Our team tracked down the origin of all the food served during their meal and included that in the app well.

Below are some screenshots from the SXSW Where to Eat app and the menu being served tomorrow night at the NFS dinner.

If you’re in Austin this weekend make sure you drop by the Better Food Through Open Data Standards panel tomorrow at 12:30pm to hear Anthony and a panel of experts discuss how recipe sites, restaurant menu wranglers, open government developers, urban agronomists, provenance geeks and food policy activists are collaborating on an interoperable standard.

Food Advocate Profile: Britta Riley & @windowfarms

Our mission at Foodtree is to connect people with where their food comes from. With this in mind we’re highlighting individuals who work in the intersection of food & technology we think do a fantastic job of contributing, promoting, and building the global food scene on a local level. We call them Food Advocates.

This post is part of a series to highlight the people involved in an upcoming SXSW panel talk: Better Food Through Open Data Standards.

About Britta Riley and Windowfarms: Britta Riley is a designer and social entrepreneur who is the CEO and Founder of Windowfarms. They’re a company that has developed a hydroponic system that utilizes vertical window space for access to natural light, and allows for year-round growing. Imagine having your own small garden of fresh herbs right in your kitchen window, even in deepest winter. Windowfarms makes this possible.

What we love about Windowfarms: They’ve created an innovative product to overcome the limitation of a small space or access to an yard that is a major factor preventing people from growing their own food. Windowfarms understands that “growing some portion of one’s own food is a simple pleasure that can make a big difference in one’s relationship with nature.”

Check out the Windowfarm selection of kits available.

Find Windowfarms online: web site | Twitter | Facebook

Food Advocate Profile: Niles Brooks & @cleanplatesnyc

Our mission at Foodtree is to connect people with where their food comes from. With this in mind we’re highlighting individuals who work in the intersection of food & technology we think do a fantastic job of contributing, promoting, and building the global food scene on a local level. We call them Food Advocates.

This post is part of a series to highlight the people involved in an upcoming SXSW panel talk: Better Food Through Open Data Standards.

About Clean Plates and Niles Brooks: Niles Brooks is the Technical co-founder and Digital Product Manager at Clean Plates. They’re a startup company that has put together a comprehensive database of restaurants in New York serving nutritious, eco-friendly food catering to every dietary preference. Carnivores, vegetarians, vegans, or a gluten-free eater can find it all here. The information is available on their web site and as a printed guide book.

What we love about Clean Plate: Their emphasis is on healthy eating and quality of life through better food choices. The team at Clean Plate has put a considerable amount of work into making sure New Yorkers can make informed decisions about the food on their plate when eating at a restaurant, and not sacrifice taste or principles. They also have awesome advice on how to eat sustainably, which you should read.

Find Clean Plate online: web site | Twitter | Facebook

Food Advocate Profile: Danielle Gould and @foodtechconnect

Our mission at Foodtree is to connect people with where their food comes from. With this in mind we’re highlighting individuals who work in the intersection of food & technology we think do a fantastic job of contributing, promoting, and building the global food scene on a local level. We call them Food Advocates.

This post is part of a series to highlight the people involved in an upcoming SXSW panel talk: Better Food Through Open Data Standards.

About Danielle Gould & Food+Tech Connect: Danielle Gould is the Founder and Editor of Food+Tech Connect, a company based in New York that connects innovators at the intersection of food and technology. In Danielle’s words she, “is a social alchemist, connecting and collaborating my way to a world shaped by better informed decisions.” She combines her food systems knowledge with technology expertise to build community and address challenges throughout the food system.

What we love about Danielle Gould & Food+Tech Connect: Danielle is a connector interested in bringing people together and making large scale changes to the food system. Food+Tech Connect fosters collaboration and dialogue through events, including panel discussions and meals highlighting local food and producers. Danielle and Food+Tech bring together fellow changemakers interested in hacking the food system and making a difference through technology.

Find Danielle online: Twitter

Find Food+Tech Connect online: web site | Twitter | NY Food+Tech Calendar of events

Food Advocate Profile: @chachasikes and Code For America

Our mission at Foodtree is to connect people with where their food comes from. With this in mind we’re highlighting individuals who work in the intersection of food & technology we think do a fantastic job of contributing, promoting, and building the global food scene on a local level. We call them Food Advocates.

This post is part of a series to highlight the people involved in an upcoming SXSW panel talk: Better Food Through Open Data Standards.

About Chacha Sikes: Chacha Sikes is a drupal developer and foodie based in San Francisco who dedicates her tech skills to making the world a better place as a fellow at Code For America. She is an experienced developer who specializes in building organizational websites and creating participatory educational experiences.

What we love about Chacha Sikes: Chacha has an amazing amount of community focused projects on the go at the moment. She founded the Drupal Open Garden Project, which allows community gardeners and technologists to collaborate through open source technology and work towards improving local food systems. She also organizes Iconathons in partnership with the Noun Project, which is an initiative to create standardized graphic symbols to be used in the public domain for common concepts related to themes like food and nutrition.

Find Chacha online: web site | Twitter | Code for America Profile

Better Food Through Open Data Standards (Vote for our SxSW Panel!)

One of the initiatives we committed to early on was the effort to create an open standard for reporting and sharing information about food via web and mobile technologies. One of the biggest challenges to rapid innovation in the food space is the tendency for distinct projects to treat similar information differently, causing interoperability issues and unnecessary difficulties for apps and systems that need to communicate.

On a very basic level, it’s an effort to call apples “apples” and oranges “oranges“.

On a deeper level, this is an effort to bring together a community of diverse people who are solving a myriad set of problems around the food system to collaborate on the language we’re all using to represent food. It’s an effort to take that critical piece of the equation out of the private domain and to democratize it.

We Need Your Votes!

(Don’t worry, it only takes ten seconds.)

Next year at South by Southwest, the largest multi-media conference in North America, a panel of experts from unique backgrounds around the food/technology field will host a discussion to present an initial framework for an open food information standard.

Our CEO Anthony is excited to be a part of it, and we’d very much appreciate your vote to include this panel in the event. The voting process determines a shortlist of potential panels, out of the 3600+ that applied.

There is an explosion in the number of services created to help people make better choices about how we produce, consume, and interact with food. Challenges related to the accuracy and completeness of data hamper the rate of innovation. A panel of leading food, data and technology doers shares their initial framework for an open standard for reporting, recording and sharing food information. Hear how recipe sites, restaurant menu wranglers, open government developers, urban agronomists, provenance geeks and food policy activists are collaborating on an interoperable standard. Panelists will share their unique perspectives and invite new collaborators to expand, refine, and put into practice an open standard. The open food data standard describes all aspects of food, in a way that allows technologists to support and enhance the success of the local food economy. Come find out how you can take part in the generation of an open data standard for food that reflects the values we place in food.

You can lend your support here! Voting ends September 1st, so please share this with any friends or family who care about food!